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03/12/2014

A new book on French Huguenots in Paris

517IavuA5ZL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg"How did the Huguenots of Paris survive, and even prosper, in the eighteenth century when the majority Catholic population was notorious for its hostility to Protestantism? Why, by the end of the Old Regime, did public opinion overwhelmingly favour giving Huguenots greater rights? This study of the growth of religious toleration in Paris traces the specific history of the Huguenots after Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes in 1685."

Let's thank Professor David Garrioch for this new synthesis:

 The Huguenots of Paris and the Coming of Religious Freedom, 1685-1789 (Cambridge, 2014). 

02/12/2014

"French evangelical networks before 1555: proto-churches?"

reformation,protestantism,france,jonathan reid,huguenots"Over eight hundred Reformed churches sprang into existence in France between 1555 and 1562. Their advent occurred after a thirty-five year period of buildup, during which evangelical doctrines gained adherents throughout the kingdom and local networks formed out of which those churches would coalesce. (..) why and how these conventicles grew and then suddenly metamorphosed into well-organized churches remains largely a mystery"

Thanks to Jonathan Reid, this mystery is solved now. In a Open edition full text version now available, let's read his contribution "French evangelical networks before 1555: proto-churches?", in Philip Benedict, Silvana Seidel Menchi & Alain Tallon (ed.), LA RÉFORME EN FRANCE ET EN ITALIE, Ecole Française de Rome, 2007 (p.105-124).

 

 

03/02/2013

Face of France's 'Good King Henri IV' reconstructed

pb-130212-king-henri-reconstruction-jsa-3.jpgFor lovers of French political and religious History, this is great news: the face of "Good Henri IV", the highly revered French king who died 400 years ago in 1610, has been reconstructed by a team of French researchers led by Philippe Charlier. Using scans of the skull believed to belong to the monarch, they created a very lively portrait of what Henry the fourth (a former Huguenot) looked like.

"Bravo"! (link here)